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Phoenix Desert Animals Picture and Video Gallery

The Scorpion Most People Encounter is the Arizona Bark Scorpion

There are more than 40 species of scorpions in Arizona. The Arizona Bark Scorpion is the only species that is really of concern to most people, since it is the one with powerful enough venom to cause harm as a result of a sting. The Arizona Bark Scorpion isn’t very big — usually no more than three inches in length. They are very common in the Phoenix area. Unfortunately for people who have a fear of scorpions, they don’t stay outside; they can be found in many Phoenix homes around the Valley of the Sun.  The Arizona bark scorpion is the species of greatest concern. The venom of a bark scorpion can cause serious discomfort.  If you suspect a sting, call phoenix poison control 800.222.1222

 

Did you know Scorpions Glow?

All scorpions fluoresce under ultraviolet light, such as an electric black light or natural moonlight. The blue-green glow comes from a substance found in the hyaline layer, a very thin but super tough coating in a part of the scorpion’s exoskeleton called the cuticle. Kids discover.com

 

5 Desert Hairy Scorpion Facts & Tips

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

The Western Diamondback Rattlesnake is the most commonly encountered snake in the Phoenix area, and can be found anywhere where neighborhoods get close to native desert habitat. These are also sometimes called “coon-tail” rattlesnakes. They can be identified by the rattle, white and black striped tail, and white-lined diamond pattern on the back. Coloration is usually drab shades of brown or grey. They are often mistaken for the Mojave Rattlesnake. A large adult diamondback in our area would be in the 3.5’ to 4’ range, with most being smaller. They are generally quick to be defensive, and quite venomous, so keep your distance and leave it alone if encountered.  If you suspect a bite, call phoenix poison control 800.222.1222

The Roadrunner

 

The Roadrunner is large, slender, black-brown and white streaked ground bird with a distinctive head crest.  The Roadrunners, also known as chaparral birds or chaparral cocks, are two species of fast-running ground cuckoos with long tails and crests. They are found in the southwestern United States and Mexico, usually in the desert. Some have been clocked at over 20 miles per hour.  Roadrunners inhabit arid areas, deserts, grasslands, scrublands and woodlands. It can be also found near the urban areas. Just like their name suggests – these birds like to run along the roads). At the moment, Roadrunners are not endangered species.

The Phoenix Roadrunner

The Coyote

Coyotes range throughout Arizona and are one of the state’s most common wild animals. From barren mountain landscapes to the lush greenery of peopled golf courses, coyotes are easily found in Arizona, although it is far more common to hear rather than see them. If you encounter a coyote just let them be.   They will most likely leave you alone and run the other way but always be cautious of wild animals.  After all, we live in their world.